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LOVE BYRON BAY ....SPECIALISTS IN INTERNATIONAL AND LOCAL CHOCOLATE.

Love Byron Bay creperie and chocolate boutique is dedicated to sourcing, creating and sharing a quality chocolate experience from Byron Bay, Australia. We'll cultivate your understanding of cocoa, stimulate the palate with a discerning appreciation, fire the imagination with unique chocolate encounters and share the passion for this legendary food of the gods. Exceptional chocolate infused with delicious flavours, irresistible aromatic characteristics and high quality cocoa. 

Blog

Choc Recipes, Choc Facts, Choc Travels and our regular Chocoholic-not-so-Anonymous feature. All this and more in our weekly blog.

Filtering by Tag: scientific

Choc News: Three chocolate bars a month can reduce heart failure

Alison Campbell

Eating three chocolate bars every month can drastically reduce your risk of experiencing heart failure, scientists have claimed.

Many people often believe that in order to live as healthily as possible, they need to eliminate all forms of sugary snacks from their diets.

Chocolate Bar.jpg

However, a recent study presented at the European Society of Cardiology conference in Munich states that moderation, not deprivation, is key in preventing heart issues later on in life.

A team of researchers assessed more than half a million adults in order to determine how consumption of chocolate impacts heart health. They came to the conclusion that eating up to three chocolate bars a month can reduce risk of heart failure by 23 per cent in comparison to those who don’t eat any chocolate at all.

However, eating too much chocolate can lead to a 17 per cent increased risk of heart failure, which is why it’s important not to go overboard. Dr Chayakrit Krittanawong, resident at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York and lead researcher of the study, explained how the flavonoids found in chocolate can be beneficial for one’s health.

“I would say moderate dark chocolate consumption is good for health.”

The team who conducted the study examined five separate studies for their research, which consisted of 575,852 individuals in total.

They stated that further research is needed to explore the connection between chocolate intake and heart health.

Earlier this year, a study carried out in California concluded that eating dark chocolate can have a positive effect on your mental health by relieving stress and boosting memory function


Source: www.independent.co.uk


Choc News : Could mango solve an impending chocolate crisis?

Alison Campbell

Chocolate lovers, your beloved snack may have just been saved by another sweet treat: mangoes.

Scientists may have found a way to solve a potential impending shortage of cocoa, which could affect future chocolate production, by using mangoes in lieu of cocoa to make chocolate, according to a study published in Scientific Reports, an open-access journal from the publishers of Nature.

"Wild mango is one of the so-called Cinderella species whose real potential is unrealized," says Sayma Akhter, the study's senior author.

Global cocoa production has been down in recent years due to a handful of factors, including changes in climate and crop failure, while demand has been on the rise, according to experts. Cocoa producers also have been accused of unfair labor practices, including employing child laborers and underpaying farmers.

Wild mango butter, the study says, may be chemically and physically similar enough to cocoa butter to act as a replacement. 

The study's authors also believe the potential commercial benefits of the fruit could be a boon to conservation efforts. "Going beyond the use to industry, wild fruits like the mango are an important source of food, medicine and income for rural dwellers, but are in decline due to drivers such as deforestation," said Morag McDonald of Bangor University, another of the study's authors. "Adding value to underutilized products through processing for products that have market value can generate a valuable incentive for the conservation of such species and help to generate alternative income sources and reduce household poverty."

Source: cnn.com