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2 Lawson Street
Byron Bay, NSW, 2481
Australia

+61 2 6685 7974

LOVE BYRON BAY ....SPECIALISTS IN INTERNATIONAL AND LOCAL CHOCOLATE.

Love Byron Bay creperie and chocolate boutique is dedicated to sourcing, creating and sharing a quality chocolate experience from Byron Bay, Australia. We'll cultivate your understanding of cocoa, stimulate the palate with a discerning appreciation, fire the imagination with unique chocolate encounters and share the passion for this legendary food of the gods. Exceptional chocolate infused with delicious flavours, irresistible aromatic characteristics and high quality cocoa. 

Blog

Choc Recipes, Choc Facts, Choc Travels and our regular Chocoholic-not-so-Anonymous feature. All this and more in our weekly blog.

Filtering by Tag: organic

Choc News: Three chocolate bars a month can reduce heart failure

Alison Campbell

Eating three chocolate bars every month can drastically reduce your risk of experiencing heart failure, scientists have claimed.

Many people often believe that in order to live as healthily as possible, they need to eliminate all forms of sugary snacks from their diets.

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However, a recent study presented at the European Society of Cardiology conference in Munich states that moderation, not deprivation, is key in preventing heart issues later on in life.

A team of researchers assessed more than half a million adults in order to determine how consumption of chocolate impacts heart health. They came to the conclusion that eating up to three chocolate bars a month can reduce risk of heart failure by 23 per cent in comparison to those who don’t eat any chocolate at all.

However, eating too much chocolate can lead to a 17 per cent increased risk of heart failure, which is why it’s important not to go overboard. Dr Chayakrit Krittanawong, resident at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York and lead researcher of the study, explained how the flavonoids found in chocolate can be beneficial for one’s health.

“I would say moderate dark chocolate consumption is good for health.”

The team who conducted the study examined five separate studies for their research, which consisted of 575,852 individuals in total.

They stated that further research is needed to explore the connection between chocolate intake and heart health.

Earlier this year, a study carried out in California concluded that eating dark chocolate can have a positive effect on your mental health by relieving stress and boosting memory function


Source: www.independent.co.uk


Choc Boss: Pana Barbotins, Pana Chocolate

Alison Campbell

Pana Barbounis has some chunky ambitions for his raw chocolate brand...Pana Chocolate. The 41-year-old entrepreneur is aiming for the world’s number one spot for raw chocolate...and he's well on his way to achieving that goal. Pana Chocolate is made from vegan, organic ingredients with no refined sugar and using minimal heat (raw) and it's proving a huge success around the world. Pana Barbotins is this month's Choc Boss.

What was your favorite chocolate treat as a child?
My mum would always treat the kids to something sweet after school, and although it
may not have been vegan this definitely started my love of chocolate. 

How did you end up becoming a chocolatier?
A close friend of mine asked me to try some raw chocolate a few years back now and it was in that moment I just knew it was the right journey for me. I spent six months developing Pana Chocolate, getting the balance of flavours right, the texture right and using the right ingredients. I tested it amongst friends and friends of friends until I was happy. And happy is what I’ve felt from the beginning and still now.

White, milk or dark?
Always dark.

Describe your favourite chocolate in three words....
Moreish, decadent, satisfying.

Tell us about your most memorable chocolate experience?
Meeting Joanne Harris, author of Chocolat.

Where is your favourite place to indulge your choc-habit?
At work, it’s an everyday occurrence! 

Secretly solo or shared indulgence?
Both, although if I’m indulging solo you’ll find me enjoying vegan ice-cream
smothered in chocolate, roasted nuts and fruit. 

What's the most unusual chocolate you've ever tasted?
It was one of my own creations, a lavender chocolate which reminded me of potpourri. 

What is the mark of an exceptional chocolatier?
Being thorough with your research, understanding your customer and their needs,
placing importance on creating experiences and not just making a product, 
and gaining experience in all facets of business yourself.

What advice would you give to someone who wants to follow in your footsteps?
Pana Chocolate is a business founded on a deep passion for quality ingredients, the health of your insides, and a desire to make the world a little nicer through sustainable practices. Having a strong vision for what you believe in and want to achieve is the greatest place to start.

Pana Barbotins is founder of Pana Chocolate.
Pana's delicous range is available from our Love Byron Bay Boutique,
or from our online store... love-byronbay.com/chocstore.

Choc Facts: why bother going organic with your chocolate?

Alison Campbell

Who on earth cares about organic chocolate?

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Chocolate is sort of an indulgence after all and not eaten in pounds per week like apples or tomatoes, so do I really need to worry about which chocolate I put into my body?

Cacao pods (a.k.a. cocoa pods) grow on trees found almost exclusively in the “cocoa belt,” a band 20 degrees north and south of the equator.   From these pods come beans that are fermented, dried, roasted, and transformed into that smooth, luscious solid we all know and love.

No one wants harmful pesticides in their food, but the benefits of organic chocolate go well beyond the obvious.  Cacao trees are usually found in lush rain forest environments that are homes to monkeys, sloths, wild birds and other unique creatures.  The use of pesticides endangers the rich biodiversity of these eco-systems.  If that’s not bad enough, some companies will clear cut the jungle first in order to plant cacao trees in neat rows – a procedure that is completely unnecessary to grow cacao.  The canopy trees that would normally form a natural habit for jungle animals is destroyed.

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Not only are rain forest animals at risk from chemical exposure, but also humans – the plantation workers.   

In some cocoa growing regions such as West Africa, where most mass-market cocoa is grown, there are fewer controls on the safety of farm workers.   

When companies seek the lowest cost beans from the global commodity market, they are blind to the social issues connected to their chocolate. 

So how can you be sure you’re getting the organic stuff? 

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It’s easy to pick out an organic chocolate bar from the crowd:  just look for an organic seal on the label.  

In Australia, organic certification is performed by several organisations that are accredited by the Department of Agriculture, Fisheries and Forestry (DAFF) under the National Standard for Organic and Biodynamic Produce. The big ones are NASAA Certified Organic  Australian Certified Organic (ACO)  and the Organic Food Chain

With so much excellent chocolate coming from Europe, you may see organic seals from France or Belgium. In the US, the USDA Organic Seal is well known. You can be confident that any of these seals is credible evidence that basic organic practices are followed.

Some have criticized organic labeling as a marketing ploy that only larger companies can afford since the certification and associated inspections cost money.  But  in our mind, organic certification leaves the details to the experts and hands us the answer in an easy to understand format.  That can’t be a bad thing.  

If you’re lucky enough to find an artisan making organic truffles, there’s a good chance that only some of the ingredients, say the chocolate shell, are organic.  Have a conversation with the proprietor and understand where their chocolate comes from.  Is it organic? Is it fair trade?  If you can find such a shop, you’ve got a gem since bulk organic chocolate used for making confections is in short supply.  That's where Love Byron Bay can help. Our website specialises in organic and fair trade chocolate, and all of the brands featured on this blog post are certified organic.

Does organic chocolate taste as good as “conventional” chocolate?

Yes, of course it does!  The flavour of the chocolate has to do with the variety of cacao, the diligence of the farmer and the skill of the chocolate maker.   Cacao farmers using pesticides and other chemicals can get more pods from their trees and improve profit, but this won’t help the flavour of the chocolate one bit.  In fact, organic chocolates are less likely to contain ingredients that have no place in high quality chocolate such as chemical additives or vegetable oils.  These ingredients only distract from the true flavor of the bean.

 

Assuming the bar is not flavoured with fruits or nuts, you should see at most four ingredients in a chocolate bar:  cocoa mass (or cocoa liqueur or cocoa solids), sugar, vanilla and soy lecithin.  That’s it.  So keep it simple – look for a simple ingredients list, look for organic certification and ask us for more information on the organic brands we carry in store. 

 

 

Source kokobuzz.wordpress.com