Contact LOVE BYRON BAY. 

Please use the form on the right to contact us.
If you prefer you can call us on +61 2 6685 7974.

 

2 Lawson Street
Byron Bay, NSW, 2481
Australia

+61 2 6685 7974

LOVE BYRON BAY ....SPECIALISTS IN INTERNATIONAL AND LOCAL CHOCOLATE.

Love Byron Bay creperie and chocolate boutique is dedicated to sourcing, creating and sharing a quality chocolate experience from Byron Bay, Australia. We'll cultivate your understanding of cocoa, stimulate the palate with a discerning appreciation, fire the imagination with unique chocolate encounters and share the passion for this legendary food of the gods. Exceptional chocolate infused with delicious flavours, irresistible aromatic characteristics and high quality cocoa. 

Blog

Choc Recipes, Choc Facts, Choc Travels and our regular Chocoholic-not-so-Anonymous feature. All this and more in our weekly blog.

Filtering by Tag: chocolate

Choc News: Belgian Chocolate Under Threat By International Takeovers

James Lamont

Since inventing the praline more than 100 years ago, Belgium has cultivated a £3.5bn chocolate industry that accounted for 9 per cent of Belgium’s food sales last year.

Belgian chocolate, one of the country’s most popular exports, has become the ultimate seal of quality and taste, but for Belgians it runs much deeper. It is a matter of national pride – and the industry is going through an identity crisis.

chocolate praline.jpg

Aside from the general pressures that come with operating in a globalised world where big fish eat the smaller ones, Belgian’s chocolatiers exist in a market where prices are rising, global demand is soaring, and where some of its most established chocolate manufacturers are being accused of muddying the good Belgian name.

“In our dictionary, Belgian means place of manufacturing, headquarters and ownership,” Ignace Van Doorselaere, chief executive of chocolatier Neuhaus, tells The Independent. “It is essential that Neuhaus is 100 per cent Belgian. It adds pride to important details, and it’s important to ensure consistent quality.”

But Steven Candries, sales director at Guylian, argues that it is possible for companies to have foreign owners and remain true to their Belgian heritage. He insists the Guylian takeover 10 years ago “hasn’t changed anything”, and that it still produces everything in Belgium. In fact, this year it has pledged to become the first Belgian chocolate manufacturer to use no palm oil in its products, which has been linked to environmental, social and health concerns.

But some Belgian manufacturers, Candries points out, make their chocolates in factories abroad, and still call it Belgian. For example, Godiva has a factory in Pennsylvania, US.

According to Guy Gallet, the secretary general of Choprabisco (the Royal Belgian Association of the Biscuit, Chocolate, Pralines and Confectionary), it’s less important who the manufacturer’s owners are.

“What’s most important for us is that the chocolate is made here. Foreign companies don’t invest in Belgian chocolate with the aim of locating it to another county, because they couldn’t then use the Belgian chocolate name,” he says.

In some cases, however, these foreign takeovers can affect product lines. Brussels-based chocolate manufacturer Godiva, for example, is almost 100 years old and was bought by American firm Campbell Soup Company in 1966 and subsequently purchased by the Turkish Yıldız Holding in 2007. Last year the company found itself in a PR nightmare when it announced it would no longer be making pralines containing liqueur, which was, up until then, one of its signature chocolates, in order to appeal to more people.

Leading Belgian chocolatier Dominique Persoone doesn’t approve. “My grandmother always bought Godiva when I was child. They were very famous for liquor chocolate but now, with their new owners, it’s forbidden. But starting to change original recipes is not a good idea,” he tells The Independent.

Annie Young-Scrivner, Godiva’s CEO, says chocolate is part of Belgium’s national identity, and the “essence of what it means to be Belgian”.

She says Godiva is a “proud ambassador of the Belgian heritage”, and that the brand is Belgian “through and through”.

Despite accusations Godiva isn’t as thoroughly Belgian as some of its competitors, two years later it was honoured with the Belgian royal warrant, and became the official chocolatier of the royal court – a role it still holds today.

The company was taken over by Yıldız partly because Godiva was assured they shared a “mutual love and passion for chocolate”, according to the Turkis firm’s chairman Murat Ülker. Young-Scrivner says Godiva has since stayed true to its Belgian heritage, which Yıldız respects, while expanding to more than 100 countries.

“We marry innovation with tradition,” she says, offering as an example the chocolatier’s range of products, which celebrate Christmas, Valentine’s Day, Chinese New Year and Ramadan. International takeovers aren’t the only threat to the coveted Belgian chocolate label; manufacturers around the world with no connection to Belgium are using the good name to shift stock, forcing chocolatiers to stand up for what they believe constitutes true Belgian chocolate.

The label certainly hasn’t happened overnight. Since Jean Neuhaus Jr, grandson of the founder of chocolate-maker Neuhaus, invented the praline in Belgium in 1912, the country has grown and attracted some of the world’s most talented chocolatiers. It invented the ballotin, a boxed packaging that keeps chocolate fresh, developed methods to transport liquid chocolate, and introduced chocolate modelling paste.

“Over 150 years ago, Belgium was an ecosystem of chocolatiers – it was the Silicon Valley of chocolate; taste profiles were refined, and craftsmen innovated and challenged each other and improved their products,” Ignace Van Doorselaere says.

European Union legislation says that in order to call a product chocolate, it must contain no more than 5 per cent substitute fat, which is cheaper than using cocoa butter. But Belgium does one better.

Belgian chocolate bears little resemblance to the sugary confectionery that goes under the name of chocolate in other parts of the world. The key is the ingredients and the purity of the cocoa, which must conform to strict regulations. Master chocolate-makers never use substitute fats.

But manufacturers argue that the quality of Belgian chocolate, and all the hard work behind it, is being undermined by sub-par chocolate claiming to be Belgian – and not enough is being done to get the situation under control.

Guy Gallet says EU legislation on misleading labels goes some way to protect Belgian chocolate, but it’s not enough.

“We have success with it and there are fewer cases these days where we need to intervene, but it’s harder in, say, China,” he says. Choprabisco is looking at “more proactive” ways of protecting the Belgian chocolate label – one that’s more specific, as the current EU protection applies for all foods.

Source: independent.co.uk

Choc Recipe: Easy Vegan Chocolate

James Lamont

EASY VEGAN CHOCOLATE

Easy, 3-ingredient vegan chocolate! Naturally sweetened, customizable, super velvety and rich, and seriously good for you!

EASY-Homemade-Vegan-Chocolate-Recipe-Simple-ingredients-naturally-sweetened-BETTER-than-storebought-vegan-chocolate-glutenfree-dessert-recipe-easy-768x1152.jpg

PREP TIME: 20 minutes

COOK TIME: 3 minutes

TOTAL TIME: 23 minutes

Ingredients

  • 1 cup finely chopped cocoa butter* (packed)
  • 3-5 Tbsp maple syrup or agave nectar
  • 1/2 cup unsweetened cocoa powder or cacao powder*
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract (optional)
  • pinch sea salt (optional // plus more to taste)
  • cacao nibs (optional // for topping)

 

EASY-Homemade-Vegan-Chocolate-Recipe-Simple-ingredients-naturally-sweetened-BETTER-than-storebought-vegan-chocolate-glutenfree-dessert-recipe-768x1153.jpg

Instructions

  1. Arrange 14 (amount as original recipe is written // adjust if altering batch size)mini cupcake liners on a small baking sheet. Set aside.

  2. Add 2 inches of water to a large saucepan and bring to a boil over medium high heat. Then set a medium glass or ceramic mixing bowl on top, making sure it's not touching the water (this creates a "double boiler").

  3. To the mixing bowl, add finely chopped cocoa butter and let melt - 2-3 minutes.

  4. Once melted, add the maple syrup or agave nectar and use a whisk or wooden spoon to mix until fluid and thoroughly combined. Remove bowl and set on a flat surface. Also, turn off stove-top heat and set saucepan aside.

  5. Add cacao or cocoa powder, vanilla (optional), and sea salt (optional), and whisk to combine until there are no clumps.

  6. Taste and adjust flavor as needed. I added about 3 Tablespoons agave total and a pinch more salt (amounts as original recipe is written // adjust if altering batch size), but it’s completely up to how sweet you prefer your chocolate.

  7. Carefully pour chocolate into 12-14 mini cupcake liners* (or 7 large cupcake liners // amount as original recipe is written // adjust if altering batch size) and top with more sea salt or cacao nibs (optional).

  8. Transfer chocolate to the freezer or refrigerator to set - about 10 minutes.

  9. Enjoy straight from the freezer, refrigerator, or at room temperature. Store leftovers in a well-sealed container in the refrigerator for 1 week, or in the freezer up to 1 month.

Source: minimalistbaker.com

Choc Recipe : Strawberry Chocolate Cheesecake Pops

Alison Campbell

These creamy strawberry cheesecake chocolate pops (without the cheese!) have the perfect balance of sweetness and acidity, with chunks of chocolate “dough” in each bite. Made with cashews, strawberries, dates, almonds, they’re actually quite good for you too. Perfect for these sunny Spring days.

long.jpg

Ingredients

For the chocolate "dough"
½ cup raw unsalted almonds
½ cup soft dates, pitted (about 11-12 dates)
2 tbsp raw cacao powder
Small pinch of sea salt

For the strawberry cheesecake filling
2 cups + ½ cup chopped strawberries
1 cup cashews, soaked for 2-3 hours
¼ cup plant-based milk (almond, cashew, coconut)
¼ cup pure maple syrup
¼ tsp ground vanilla powder
2 tbsp melted coconut oil
2 tbsp lemon juice

Method

Place the almonds in a food processor and blend on high until you get a powder/coarse flour. Add the pitted dates, cacao powder and sea salt and blend again until combined. The dough should be sticky and should hold together when pinch. If it's too dry, add one or two more dates and blend again.

Make the strawberry puree by blending ½ cup strawberries in a blender. Pour about one spoonful of the puree into each popsicle mould.

Drain cashews and rinse well. In the same blender, blend together the remaining strawberries (2 cups), cashews, milk, maple syrup, vanilla, coconut oil and lemon juice until smooth and creamy. The filling should be quite thick. Pour into your popsicle moulds, on top of the strawberry puree, leaving some space for the chocolate mixture.

Add bits of the chocolate "dough" into each mould, reserving some for the tops of the popsicles. Using a stick, carefully press down to insert the chocolate dough into the creamy filling. Insert the sticks and then top with the remaining chocolate mixture.

Place in the freezer to set, about 5-6 hours.
To remove the popsicles, run the moulds under hot water until you can easily pull them out.

Makes 10 pops.

Source: thegreenlife.ca
Photos: Sophie Bourdon

Choc Recipe: Vegan/Gluten Free Chocolate and Peanut Butter Fudge

Alison Campbell

Healthy fudge? Did you hear that right? Yup. It’s real, dreamy and tastes like the real deal. Plus only 4 ingredients are involved! I love that this recipe literally takes 5 minutes to make, then you’ll just stick it in the freezer until the fudge hardens a bit — usually this only takes about 10-15 minutes. Then boom! Dessert is served. A low sugar, high-protein treat that you’ll want to make every week. Promise. Get amongst it. :)

Ingredients

For the peanut butter layer:
1/2 cup creamy or crunchy drippy peanut butter
1/3 cup coconut butter
1 tablespoon pure maple syrup (or coconut palm syrup)

For the chocolate layer:
1/2 cup creamy or crunchy drippy peanut butter
1/3 cup coconut butter
1 tablespoon unsweetened cocoa powder (or raw cacao powder)
1 tablespoon pure maple syrup (or coconut palm syrup)
Optional: Coarse sea salt, for sprinkling on top

Method

Line an 8x4 inch loaf pan with parchment paper.
To make the peanut butter layer: In a medium bowl mix together peanut butter, coconut butter and maple syrup. Mix until smooth.
To make the chocolate layer: In a medium bowl, mix together peanut butter, coconut butter, cocoa powder and maple syrup. Mix until smooth and combined.
Add the chocolate fudge layer to the loaf pan and spread evenly towards the sides. Tap the pan on the counter a few times to get any air bubbles out and also to help distribute the layer evenly.
Next add the peanut butter layer on top. Use a rubber spatula to gently spread over the chocolate layer towards the edges of the pan, being careful not to mix them.
Sprinkle sea salt on top, then place in freezer for 10-15 minutes or until the fudge hardens.
Once the fudge has hardened, remove from the pan and allow to sit at room temperature for 5 minutes before cutting into squares. Do not leave out at room temperature for more than 10-15 minutes at a time. Can freeze for up to 3 months.

Makes 18 squares.

Notes
It’s best to use a peanut butter made with only peanuts and salt here, or an all-natural brand without additional additives. Any nut butter should work to use as a replacement for the peanut butter. Although, it is best to use a drippy version.

Source: ambitiouskitchen.com
Photo's: Sarah Fennel

Choc Travel: The Aroma Coffee and Chocolate Festival

Alison Campbell

Bringing our regular Choc Travel feature a bit closer to home this month, we're looking forward to the Aroma Coffee and Chocolate Festival in the Hunter Valley this year.

The warm aroma of freshly ground coffee beans and rich melted chocolate descend on Maitland in the Hunter Valley during this wintery August festival. Featuring expert chocolatiers, talented baristas and the best of the region’s winemakers it is the perfect way to ward off the winter chill.

This festival of the senses sees the riverside come alive, allowing rugged up visitors to enjoy some of the most indulgent products from across the entire Hunter Region.

Each winter Maitland casts off the winter blues with a few thousand cups of hot coffee and sweet chocolate treats, but the Aroma Festival is more than just an excuse to indulge  – it’s a celebration of the region’s growing love affair with the people and products behind the food and coffee scene.

This year the festival takes place on the 12-13 August, bringing dozens of stalls, experts, artists and attractions to the riverside carpark, the riverbank and the Levee in Maitland. The festival has grown year-on-year - last year over 15,000 people attended the festival and this year is set to be bigger and better.  Sounds like a good excuse for a weekend break in the Hunter Valley. We'll see you there. :)

The event runs from 10am to 4pm on the 12-13 August.
For more information visit maitlandaroma.com.au

Photos: maitlandaroma.com.au
Sources: maitlandmercury.com.au
               mymaitland.com.au

Choc Travel : The Grenada Chocolate Festival

Alison Campbell

At 344 square kilometres, with an estimated population of 110,000, Grenada is home to miles of unspoiled white sand beaches, verdant green rolling hills, mountainous peaks, winding rivers, and cascading waterfalls. But it is also the 'Island of Spice' ...a  leading producer of cinnamon, cloves, ginger, mace, allspice, orange/citrus peels, wild coffee, nutmeg and delicious organic cacao. The perfect Caribbean destination for a chocolate festival!

The upcoming Grenada Chocolate Festival takes place from May 12th to May 20th 2017. Visitors to this 9-day chocolate-themed festival will have the opportunity to partake in a unique visitor experience based around Grenada’s pure, delicious, organic and sustainable cacao industry.

Highlights include:

  • Becoming a farmer for a day and experience the old fashion and ethical way to grow and pick organic cacao.
  • Learning from Grenadian artisans how hand-made, small-batch, ethically-produced, tree to bar chocolate is crafted.
  • Taking a journey through the history of chocolate, bartering with cocoa beans as the Mayas did, learning to grind cocoa the old fashioned way and taste a wide range of decadently delicious chocolate food and desserts.
  • Kicking back and relaxing with friends while indulging with aromas of locally brewed chocolate cuisine, beer and rums and dancing to local drums by a bonfire at the beach, enjoying chocolate Pina Coladas and other exotic chocolate-inspired Caribbean cocktails.

And in between all that chocolate tasting, you'll be able to discover the beautiful island of Grenada, its friendly people and pristine natural environment, and luxuriate in cocoa-infused island life.