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2 Lawson Street
Byron Bay, NSW, 2481
Australia

+61 2 6685 7974

LOVE BYRON BAY ....SPECIALISTS IN INTERNATIONAL AND LOCAL CHOCOLATE.

Love Byron Bay creperie and chocolate boutique is dedicated to sourcing, creating and sharing a quality chocolate experience from Byron Bay, Australia. We'll cultivate your understanding of cocoa, stimulate the palate with a discerning appreciation, fire the imagination with unique chocolate encounters and share the passion for this legendary food of the gods. Exceptional chocolate infused with delicious flavours, irresistible aromatic characteristics and high quality cocoa. 

Blog

Choc Recipes, Choc Facts, Choc Travels and our regular Chocoholic-not-so-Anonymous feature. All this and more in our weekly blog.

Filtering by Category: Choc God

Choc God : Melissa Coppel

Alison Campbell

Chocolatier Melissa Coppel has chartered new territory in her journey from bean to bonbon, molding her love of chocolate with her training in plated desserts to create a unique and exciting range, from her base in Las Vegas, Nevada. 

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A Columbian native, Coppel left her home country after high school to study classic pastry at The French Pastry school in Chicago. Soon after, she moved to Las Vegas to work at Joel Robuchon at the Mansion, a three Michelin Star Restaurant where she ran the pastry kitchen of L’Atelier de Joel Robuchon.

When she realized that her true passion was chocolate, she pursued experience in the field working in Casinos like Caesar’s Palace and The Bellagio, where she was dedicated to working only with chocolate. In 2012 she co-founded Jean-Marie Auboine Chocolates, a wholesale chocolate company. 

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Coppel's great obsession is the integration of the flavours and textures of plated desserts into chocolatier.

Desserts have always seduced me,’ she says. 'Imagine a bonbon replacing a dessert! Playing with the concepts for a plated dessert, bonbon or bar of chocolate seems like a great idea! I believe the Imagination and sensitivity of restaurant pastry is missing in chocolaterie. With a dessert, immediacy is present, and the components cannot wait long before being consumed, as happens in the sautéed apples, fruit granita, ice cream quenelles, etc. When a bonbon is offered, the diner does not expect anything more than a chocolate ganache with some sort of infusion. Always the same. I like to play  around with the techniques, flavours and compositions. I believe in a real synergy between plated desserts and chocolate-making.'

In 2013 Coppel won the title of 'Chocolatier of the Year' at the Pastry Live Competition in Atlanta. In 2016 she was named one of the Top Ten Chocolatiers in North America by Dessert Professional Magazine. She is widely recognised for her exceptional chocolate artistry.

Source: melissacoppel.com

Choc God : Gerhard Petzl

Alison Campbell

Master Chocolatier, WACS Global Master Chef, Culinary Olympics winner and sculptor, Gerhard Petzl has made a name for himself with his awe-inspiring chocolate sculptures. Writer Jasmine Greene talked sculpture with this months Choc God.

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What is your background in the arts? Were you always interested in sculpting?
As I have always been drawing and painting from my early childhood as an Austrian, I have always been committed to art through music, galleries or looking at historical buildings or places. After 15 years of working in my profession, I decided to intensify my studies in the field of art and graduated with a diploma of ‘Master Classes of Art & Design’, section ‘Sculpturing’, in 2005. In the beginning I tried it with music but my real passion arose after I discovered creating 3-dimensional objects in various materials.

Why did you choose chocolate as a medium? What is it about this material that drew you to it?
As a Master Pastry Chef and Master Chocolatier, I usually work internationally as a Pastry Consultant which includes several project requests, doing chocolate-related artworks and chocolate sculptures for TV productions, hotels, shows, fairs and museums. By the way, I am currently holding the record of the ‘World’s Largest Chocolate Santa Claus’ which was 3.65 meters tall and which I modeled during a business assignment in Germany in 2005. It took me 3 days and nights, I lost 4 kilos of body weight during that time when I only slept 6 hours in 3 days. Chocolate has always been pushing me to the limit. The medium ‘chocolate’ is much more than a sum of ingredients, chocolate is the ‘food of the goddesses’ and I always show my appreciation of this incredibly versatile and mysterious material I am working with.

How long have you been working with chocolate? Do you find something new about it each time you work with it or has working with it gotten easier over time?
During roughly 20 years of chocolate shows I have identified so many different faces of chocolate – which even nowadays makes me feel like I was still an apprentice regarding this material. Every time I am trying out something new, I think of another new field and combine different working techniques as needed. Jumping between the borders of being a professional Pastry Chef, an artist and a development researcher, I am motivating myself of opening the doors showing the world how chocolate can be: beautiful and unexpectedly pretty but also stressful at the same time. And yes, after all those years of working with it, I know the limitations of the material pretty well – which still does not mean that there are no surprises anymore.

Which aspect of your chocolate art do you find most challenging (body art, chocolate paintings or sculptures) and why?
Every field, every section of chocolate art has its own beauty, advantages, opportunities, durability and limits. Doing body art is energy-intense because working an hour on a human, warm or cooler skin, with movements up and down through breathing of the model, is not that easy like it seems to be. After finishing this kind of artwork, it only stays for additional 10 minutes on the model’s skin – just for a photo shooting – and then it will be gone forever. What remains for lifetime, are the memory and the photographer’s pictures of a sweet and beautiful moment. Making sculptures gives me totally different possibilities and they last 10 years or longer, depending on where and under which conditions they are stored.

What inspires you to create these pieces of work?
Different countries, cultures and people, impressive nature but also buildings (like temples). Even listening to an unknown strange language or the movements of a bird may create ideas for a future sculpture or picture.

Chocolate is a material that will eventually degrade over time. As an artist, how do you feel that the lifespan of your work, unlike actual marble sculptures, oil paintings, etc., is ephemeral?
In the art scene one often hears that the value of an object of art depends on the choice of material. I do not agree to this. The real value can only be in the beauty of the moment. We are not living in the past or in the future, we are living now. Sometimes, after completion of some chocolate piece of art, I even melt down the sculpture again because being the creator and the destroyer is just showing the life cycle of everything and every person, growing, being, dying – just on a compressed time schedule. Whenever somebody looks at my sculptures or artworks, he/she should enjoy the beauty of the moment and realize what happens during that one second in his/her brain while looking at it for the first time. If you think about this, you are on the best way to find out more about yourself.

Sourcenardio.net

Choc God : Norman Love

Alison Campbell

“Chocolate is my passion,” says Norman Love, who dreamed of making chocolate that was visually stunning as well as delicious. And so a hand-painted moulded chocolate dream was born.

Norman Love has been producing beautiful handcrafted chocolate in Fort Myers, Florida, USA since 2001.

With an emphasis on artistry, premium ingredients, and innovative flavour combinations, the renowned chocolatier has earned significant acclaim for his edible masterpieces which are molded and then filled with the finest chocolate imported from Belgium, France, and Switzerland. The pumpkin white chocolate bonbon is almost too gorgeous to eat. Using only the freshest ingredients, his recipes call for pureed raspberries, bananas, ginger, caramel, passionfruit, and hazelnuts, to name a few.

An early love of art and baking first inspired Norman Love to pursue a career in the culinary world. After learning the craft of pastry making in France, he accepted the role of corporate executive pastry chef at The Ritz-Carlton. During his 13 year tenure with the luxury hotel, Love oversaw all pastry and baking operations, opening 30 resort pastry kitchens across the globe.

In 2001, the culinary virtuoso left the corporate world and entered into private enterprise. His adventurous flair and love of the avant-garde stood him in good stead. Originally intending to sell wholesale to acquaintances he had made in the restaurant industry, Love quickly realized that there was great consumer demand for the ultra-premium chocolates he was producing, and opened his flagship chocolate salon. In the 16 years since, Norman Love Confections has opened three additional chocolate salons, along with an artisan gelato shop.

Norman Love Confections has been named the best premium chocolate company in the United States six times since 2006. 

Source: normanloveconfections.com

Choc God : Paul A Young

Alison Campbell

He's the flavour alchemist and master chocolatier who burst onto the international chocolate scene six years ago with challenging and exotic creations, wild and wonderful flavours. 

Paul A Young wasted no time in securing himself a spot at the forefront of the chocolate world. Trained by the best, (he started out as Marco Pierre White’s pastry chef) Young has become one of the UK’s best known chocolatiers by changing the way we think about flavours. Young has a reputation as an incredibly creative flavour alchemist who often develops flavour combinations that are original, experimental, sometimes daring, yet always perfectly balanced. From his famous Marmite Ganache, to his popular Port & Stilton truffle and Cigar Leaf Caramel, there’s nothing run of the mill about his chocolates. Whether his creations elicit an unashamed “love or hate” reaction they will force you to change your perception of how chocolates should be made. 

Young is the only chocolatier in London working in a truly artisan way. He and his team make all their creations completely by hand in the kitchens at each shop, in small batches and at every stage using fresh ingredients. Compounds, concentrates, essences, preservatives and additives are not used. Young is a groundbreaking and inspirational chocolatier. His passion for his craft and his cutting edge creativity have won him numerous awards and led to him being ranked amongst the world’s best chocolatiers. 

After studying hotel catering and management at Durham and Leeds Metropolitan University, Paul quickly worked through the ranks of a restaurant kitchen to the position of head pastry chef for Marco Pierre White at Quo Vadis and Criterion. He then began to specialise in chocolate, and opened his first shop on Camden Passage in Islington in 2006 with his business partner James Cronin. Since then Paul has been creating products that have won numerous industry awards, wowed customers and earned him the reputation he has today.

His first book ‘Adventures with Chocolate’ won the World’s Best Chocolate Book at the Gourmand Cookbook Awards in Paris, was shortlisted for the Andre Simon Award and included in the Independent’s Top 50 cookbooks. In 2014 Paul was named Outstanding British Chocolatier by the International Chocolate Awards.

Source: chocablog.com
and paulayoung.co.uk

Choc God : Patrick Roger

Alison Campbell

Patrick Roger is more than just a chocolatier: he is a chocolate artist. Treating chocolate like a sculptor might his clay, he transforms it into his signature cocoa-based sculptures. 

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    It’s undeniable that Patrick Roger’s chocolates have taste. One bite of his signature chocolate, a shiny chartreuse orb filled with liquid lime caramel and packaged individually in a tiny turquoise case that could easily be mistaken for Tiffany’s ring box, confirms that his sweets have style and substance. There’s an attention to detail throughout the process, from how the ingredients are sourced and prepared to how the chocolates are presented (when Patrick Roger staff handle the merchandise, they put on black gloves to match the carefully designed interior).  Roger’s studio in the suburb of Sceaux supplies his nine shops throughout Paris and Belgium with a wide variety of bonbons, truffles, bars, and whimsical, seasonal sculptures. His chocolates are some of the best looking and best tasting in the city. The exquisite chic treats make his shop a chocoholics dream.   After decades at the top of France’s chocolate scene, Roger is shaking up the art of chocolate-making. Whereas other chocolatiers aim for gloss, Roger may create a brushed effect on hens so realistic you almost expect them to lay (chocolate) eggs. The clean lines of Roger’s shop show off his bold style and playful displays. Contemporary flavours like lemongrass and Sichuan peppercorn mix with classic pralines, dark ganaches, and caramels. The zippy notes of fresh lime juice enlivens a cushion of ganache, smoky Earl Grey tea, and meltingly tender rum raisin-filled nuggets: all are examples of the masterful balance of flavours he works with. Rochers, square cubes of chocolate, flecked with little crackly-bits then dipped in chocolate couverture, or perfect squares of nougatine, a caramelized melange of crispy nuts and burnt sugar, ground together to a paste, formed into cubes and neatly enclosed in chocolat amer.  Many of his customers either wander in,, lured by the simple, yet dramatic chocolate displays in the window and seem to walk around the shop in a daze, not sure of where to begin or what to taste. The other customers are food-savvy Parisians, who’ve stopped in to pick up a little sack of noisettes, wild hazelnuts dipped in crisp caramel on their way home.  Make sure you add one of Patrick Rogers shops to your chocolate check list for Paris.   Locations : 108 boulevard St Germain des Prés, 6e; 91 rue de Rennes, 6e; 199 rue du Faubourg Saint-Honoré, 8e;45 avenue Victor Hugo, 16e; 12 cité Berryer, Village Royal, 8e.    Source :  davidlebovitz.com , . timeout.com   and parisbymouth.com

It’s undeniable that Patrick Roger’s chocolates have taste. One bite of his signature chocolate, a shiny chartreuse orb filled with liquid lime caramel and packaged individually in a tiny turquoise case that could easily be mistaken for Tiffany’s ring box, confirms that his sweets have style and substance. There’s an attention to detail throughout the process, from how the ingredients are sourced and prepared to how the chocolates are presented (when Patrick Roger staff handle the merchandise, they put on black gloves to match the carefully designed interior).

Roger’s studio in the suburb of Sceaux supplies his nine shops throughout Paris and Belgium with a wide variety of bonbons, truffles, bars, and whimsical, seasonal sculptures. His chocolates are some of the best looking and best tasting in the city. The exquisite chic treats make his shop a chocoholics dream. 

After decades at the top of France’s chocolate scene, Roger is shaking up the art of chocolate-making. Whereas other chocolatiers aim for gloss, Roger may create a brushed effect on hens so realistic you almost expect them to lay (chocolate) eggs. The clean lines of Roger’s shop show off his bold style and playful displays. Contemporary flavours like lemongrass and Sichuan peppercorn mix with classic pralines, dark ganaches, and caramels. The zippy notes of fresh lime juice enlivens a cushion of ganache, smoky Earl Grey tea, and meltingly tender rum raisin-filled nuggets: all are examples of the masterful balance of flavours he works with. Rochers, square cubes of chocolate, flecked with little crackly-bits then dipped in chocolate couverture, or perfect squares of nougatine, a caramelized melange of crispy nuts and burnt sugar, ground together to a paste, formed into cubes and neatly enclosed in chocolat amer.

Many of his customers either wander in,, lured by the simple, yet dramatic chocolate displays in the window and seem to walk around the shop in a daze, not sure of where to begin or what to taste. The other customers are food-savvy Parisians, who’ve stopped in to pick up a little sack of noisettes, wild hazelnuts dipped in crisp caramel on their way home.

Make sure you add one of Patrick Rogers shops to your chocolate check list for Paris.

Locations: 108 boulevard St Germain des Prés, 6e; 91 rue de Rennes, 6e; 199 rue du Faubourg Saint-Honoré, 8e;45 avenue Victor Hugo, 16e; 12 cité Berryer, Village Royal, 8e.


Source: davidlebovitz.com, .timeout.com and parisbymouth.com