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If you prefer you can call us on +61 2 6685 7974.

 

2 Lawson Street
Byron Bay, NSW, 2481
Australia

+61 2 6685 7974

LOVE BYRON BAY ....SPECIALISTS IN INTERNATIONAL AND LOCAL CHOCOLATE.

Love Byron Bay creperie and chocolate boutique is dedicated to sourcing, creating and sharing a quality chocolate experience from Byron Bay, Australia. We'll cultivate your understanding of cocoa, stimulate the palate with a discerning appreciation, fire the imagination with unique chocolate encounters and share the passion for this legendary food of the gods. Exceptional chocolate infused with delicious flavours, irresistible aromatic characteristics and high quality cocoa. 

Blog

Choc Recipes, Choc Facts, Choc Travels and our regular Chocoholic-not-so-Anonymous feature. All this and more in our weekly blog.

Choc Fact: Milk Chocolate vs. Dark Chocolate?

Alison Campbell

With all the recent talk about how certain types of chocolate are indeed good for you, an excuse to eat it isn't all that hard to find. But before you go and start eating chocolate bar after bar though, there is a small catch to all this good-for-you business. Chocolate, no matter the type, is still a source of calories and because it tastes oh-so-good to so many of us, it's easy to over do it.

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Plus, not all chocolates are created equal. To get the health benefits chocolate provides, you really have to know which chocolate bar offers the most amount of nutrients and the least amount of calorie-ridden fat and sugar.

Milk Chocolate vs. Dark Chocolate Although milk chocolate may taste great, it's not nearly as good for you as dark chocolate is. This is because milk chocolate contains less of the original cocoa bean than dark chocolate does. Although milk chocolate does contain cocoa solids, it's often diluted with the addition of milk solids, sugar, and cream. Since milk chocolate does contain some cocoa solids though, its not completely void of all nutrition; however, the nutritional quality is minimal in comparison with dark chocolate, which typically has more of the original cocoa present. This is important because the more cocoa that is present, the higher the nutritional quality. Cocoa is a fabulous source of flavonoids, a special class of antioxidants that are the primary reason chocolate is now considered to be a good-for-you treat.

The more cocoa, the more flavonoids, and the better for you the chocolate becomes. Plus, dark chocolate varieties often have less added sugar and fat which can also improve its overall nutritional value.

The Benefits of Flavonoids Flavonoids are often found in wine, fruits, vegetables, and, of course, dark chocolate. These flavonoids have been shown to reduce the amount of cell damage often implicated in heart disease. Flavonoids also help improve vascular function and can assist in lowering blood pressure. They can also enhance the power of vitamin C and prevent inflammation throughout the body when eaten in proper amounts. Some studies have also shown that they may be beneficial in keeping blood glucose levels stable and may help normalize cholesterol levels as well. 

Of course, the claimed health benefits of flavonoid-rich chocolate comes from mostly short-term, uncontrolled studies, so more research will be needed to confirm how truly beneficial these properties of chocolate are.

Picking the Best Chocolate You want to make sure that you are consuming chocolate in moderation and choosing dark chocolate varieties that contain at least 65% cacao. Don't assume your grocery store check-out dark chocolate bar is best; look for the percentage of cacao first. You may also want to consider rearranging other areas of your diet to make room for your chocolate consumption. Just be smart about it and make sure you aren't removing nutritious options from your regular meal plan so that you can eat more chocolate. Instead, limit yourself to no more than three ounces of chocolate per day and look for ways to incorporate it into other healthy dishes. Fresh fruit, low-fat yogurt, and high fiber cereal are just a few nutritious dishes that a sprinkle of chocolate would pair well with. Although consuming chocolate is one way to promote a healthy heart, other dietary changes can be just as beneficial in protecting your cardiovascular function. Instead of consuming a whole bar or even the full three ounces of chocolate, look for other ways to incorporate flavonoids into your day. Fruits and vegetables are always a good choice and you don't have to worry as much about going overboard. Plus, fruits and vegetables are rich in so many other nutrients that eating enough on a regular basis will guarantee not only better heart health, but better overall health as well.

source: www.fitnessmagazine.com

Choc Fact: Why Do Salt & Chocolate Work Wonders Together?

Alison Campbell

If you think that the words salarysoldier and salt have nothing in common, you’d better keep on reading. In ancient times, salt was difficult to obtain, making it a scarse and expensive commodity. It was a highly valued trade item and was considered a form of currency by certain peoples.

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It makes total sense that the word salary comes from the Latin word “salarium”, which literally means “salt money”. And since Roman soldiers were partly paid in salt, it is said to be for this reason that we get the word soldier from “sal dare”, which means “to give salt”. 

Does the preciousness of salt ring a bell? 

Cacao had pretty much the same value among Mesoamerican populations. To the point that cacao beans were even employed as ready cash! Among the Aztecs of Nicaragua, you could buy a rabbit for 10 cacao beans, a slave for 100 or the services of a prostitute for 8. Whenever they enjoyed their chocolate beverages, they were literally drinking money.

Thousands of years later, salt and cacao find themselves together in the most mouth watering chocolate creations from all over the world.

Why do salt and chocolate pair so well together?

Combining salt and chocolate is no ‘Latest Trend’

If inclusions like turmeric and matcha come and go, chocolate makers and chocolatiers won’t stop adding salt to their chocolate any time soon. You can be sure that you will always find a Sea Salt bar in their assortments. This is because salt works wonders with chocolate, and there are several reasons why:

1) Salt is a sugar detector.

Ever wondered why “a pinch of salt” is always added in dessert recipes? It would seem counterproductive, but it’s not. Paradoxically, salt intensifies the body’s ability to taste the sweetness in the sugar.

When sodium is present, sensors located in our intestines and on our tongue that normally don’t alert to sugar process glucose as sweet. To be more specific, an intestinal glucose sensor known as SGLT1 starts moving glucose into the sweet taste receptor cells when sodium is present, thus triggering the cells to register sweetness. The result is that salt not only alerts our ‘salt sensitivity’, but also triggers a reaction with our ‘sweet sensitive’ taste buds to make them more receptive to sweet flavors. It’s like a second sugar detector is being signaled that you’re eating something sugary.

That pinch of salt enhances tastes and makes flavors “pop”, giving life and energy to the simplest recipes. Most sweet foods, desserts or baked goods will have some amounts of salt added for this purpose. Our beloved chocolate is no exception. With the addition of salt, a fuller chocolate flavor comes up and all the intrinsic flavors are faster brought to the surface to be enjoyed.

2) Salt adds texture and flavor.

Crunchiness often makes chocolate more intriguing (depending on personal taste, of course). A coarser or grainier texture can be the secret to revive a flat chocolate, or to bring a wonderful one to glory. When chocolate professionals add salt to their creations, they can do it for two reasons:

  • to make the chocolate taste “pop”.

  • to actually taste the salt in the chocolate.

In the first case, salt has a supportive role more than being the protagonist. For this purpose, the choice is usually a finer salt whose grains are tiny and almost imperceptible. The result is a slightly grainy texture that doesn’t interfere too much with the smoothness of the chocolate. In the second case, salt is an integrated part of the recipe and has the same importance of all the other ingredients. For this purpose, the choice is usually a specialty salt that brings its own texture and flavor to the table. The crystals are larger to give a salty crunch and taste to the chocolate, and the result is grainier chocolate where salt can be detected at first sight.

In either cases, professionals need to be careful with the quantity they use. Too little, and they don’t get the benefits. Too much, and all they taste is salt. Rule of thumb: balance. Saltiness shouldn’t pass unnoticed, neither overpower the rich chocolate flavor.

3) Salt contrasts sweetness.

Although a “pinch of salt” can be used to enhance sweetness, a more substantial amount of salt can be useful to actually contrast the sweetness of a chocolate creation. Let’s be aware that cacao is not sweet itself. Even the most fruity and floral cacao is still considered to be “bitter” by most palates. What salt can help to contrast is the sweetness of sugar and other sweet inclusions. With ingredients like caramel, milk, vanilla or dried fruits, it’s easy to reach an overwhelming level of sweetness fast. By adding salt in this kind of inclusion bars, chocolate professionals ensure that the sweet ingredients are kept at bay thanks to the sodium. This sweet-and-salty contrast can also bring to life innovative chocolate creations that challenge the limits of our palates.

Like it or not, salt and chocolate is like bread and butter, peanut butter and jelly, cheese and wine. That kind of pairing that will never go out of style.

Source: thechocolatejournalist.com

Choc News: Belgian Chocolate Under Threat By International Takeovers

Alison Campbell

Since inventing the praline more than 100 years ago, Belgium has cultivated a £3.5bn chocolate industry that accounted for 9 per cent of Belgium’s food sales last year.

Belgian chocolate, one of the country’s most popular exports, has become the ultimate seal of quality and taste, but for Belgians it runs much deeper. It is a matter of national pride – and the industry is going through an identity crisis.

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Aside from the general pressures that come with operating in a globalised world where big fish eat the smaller ones, Belgian’s chocolatiers exist in a market where prices are rising, global demand is soaring, and where some of its most established chocolate manufacturers are being accused of muddying the good Belgian name.

“In our dictionary, Belgian means place of manufacturing, headquarters and ownership,” Ignace Van Doorselaere, chief executive of chocolatier Neuhaus, tells The Independent. “It is essential that Neuhaus is 100 per cent Belgian. It adds pride to important details, and it’s important to ensure consistent quality.”

But Steven Candries, sales director at Guylian, argues that it is possible for companies to have foreign owners and remain true to their Belgian heritage. He insists the Guylian takeover 10 years ago “hasn’t changed anything”, and that it still produces everything in Belgium. In fact, this year it has pledged to become the first Belgian chocolate manufacturer to use no palm oil in its products, which has been linked to environmental, social and health concerns.

But some Belgian manufacturers, Candries points out, make their chocolates in factories abroad, and still call it Belgian. For example, Godiva has a factory in Pennsylvania, US.

According to Guy Gallet, the secretary general of Choprabisco (the Royal Belgian Association of the Biscuit, Chocolate, Pralines and Confectionary), it’s less important who the manufacturer’s owners are.

“What’s most important for us is that the chocolate is made here. Foreign companies don’t invest in Belgian chocolate with the aim of locating it to another county, because they couldn’t then use the Belgian chocolate name,” he says.

In some cases, however, these foreign takeovers can affect product lines. Brussels-based chocolate manufacturer Godiva, for example, is almost 100 years old and was bought by American firm Campbell Soup Company in 1966 and subsequently purchased by the Turkish Yıldız Holding in 2007. Last year the company found itself in a PR nightmare when it announced it would no longer be making pralines containing liqueur, which was, up until then, one of its signature chocolates, in order to appeal to more people.

Leading Belgian chocolatier Dominique Persoone doesn’t approve. “My grandmother always bought Godiva when I was child. They were very famous for liquor chocolate but now, with their new owners, it’s forbidden. But starting to change original recipes is not a good idea,” he tells The Independent.

Annie Young-Scrivner, Godiva’s CEO, says chocolate is part of Belgium’s national identity, and the “essence of what it means to be Belgian”.

She says Godiva is a “proud ambassador of the Belgian heritage”, and that the brand is Belgian “through and through”.

Despite accusations Godiva isn’t as thoroughly Belgian as some of its competitors, two years later it was honoured with the Belgian royal warrant, and became the official chocolatier of the royal court – a role it still holds today.

The company was taken over by Yıldız partly because Godiva was assured they shared a “mutual love and passion for chocolate”, according to the Turkis firm’s chairman Murat Ülker. Young-Scrivner says Godiva has since stayed true to its Belgian heritage, which Yıldız respects, while expanding to more than 100 countries.

“We marry innovation with tradition,” she says, offering as an example the chocolatier’s range of products, which celebrate Christmas, Valentine’s Day, Chinese New Year and Ramadan. International takeovers aren’t the only threat to the coveted Belgian chocolate label; manufacturers around the world with no connection to Belgium are using the good name to shift stock, forcing chocolatiers to stand up for what they believe constitutes true Belgian chocolate.

The label certainly hasn’t happened overnight. Since Jean Neuhaus Jr, grandson of the founder of chocolate-maker Neuhaus, invented the praline in Belgium in 1912, the country has grown and attracted some of the world’s most talented chocolatiers. It invented the ballotin, a boxed packaging that keeps chocolate fresh, developed methods to transport liquid chocolate, and introduced chocolate modelling paste.

“Over 150 years ago, Belgium was an ecosystem of chocolatiers – it was the Silicon Valley of chocolate; taste profiles were refined, and craftsmen innovated and challenged each other and improved their products,” Ignace Van Doorselaere says.

European Union legislation says that in order to call a product chocolate, it must contain no more than 5 per cent substitute fat, which is cheaper than using cocoa butter. But Belgium does one better.

Belgian chocolate bears little resemblance to the sugary confectionery that goes under the name of chocolate in other parts of the world. The key is the ingredients and the purity of the cocoa, which must conform to strict regulations. Master chocolate-makers never use substitute fats.

But manufacturers argue that the quality of Belgian chocolate, and all the hard work behind it, is being undermined by sub-par chocolate claiming to be Belgian – and not enough is being done to get the situation under control.

Guy Gallet says EU legislation on misleading labels goes some way to protect Belgian chocolate, but it’s not enough.

“We have success with it and there are fewer cases these days where we need to intervene, but it’s harder in, say, China,” he says. Choprabisco is looking at “more proactive” ways of protecting the Belgian chocolate label – one that’s more specific, as the current EU protection applies for all foods.

Source: independent.co.uk

Choc Recipe: Tasty Raw Chocolate

Alison Campbell

This is a simple way to make healthy raw chocolate. You can make them for yourself, friends, family or the little ones. They’re a great way to spark a table and they taste absolute delicious.

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Ingredients

  • 200 grams (1 cup) raw cacao butter or raw, extra virgin coconut oil (or a combination of 100gram of each), melted

  • 30 grams (¼ cup) cacao powder

  • 2-4 tablespoons sweetener (honey, maple syrup or rice malt syrup) you can adjust the sweetness to your taste

Method

  1. Simply melt the cacao butter or coconut oil over a very low heat (I find placing in a bowl over hot water is best), or Thermomix (temp 50, speed 1) until just melted. If making with just coconut oil, it only needs to be softened, not melted to make it. 

  2. Add the cacao powder and sweetener, mix until well combined. Pour into chocolate moulds or mini cupcake baking cups. You can also spread out over a baking sheet to make a bark. 

  3. Place in the freezer immediately to set (don't delay with this). 

  4. Once set, keep in an airtight container in either the fridge or freezer.

Tips

  1. A few people have had issues with the sweetener and base fat not combining completely. Make sure you don't over heat the mixture, it should be barely luke warm (not hot). 

  2. If you happen to overheat it, try mixing with a stick blender or whipping it up in a blender just before pouring into a mould and get it into the freezer to set asap!

  3. Because both coconut oil and cacao butter melt when exposed to even a little heat, these chocolates always need to be kept cold (especially important if you use coconut oil for the fat). So, unfortunately, they are no good for picnics or lunch boxes (unless packed against an ice pack).


Variations:

Coconut-free

Choose cacao butter rather than coconut oil. 

Fructose friendly

Choose rice malt syrup as your sweetener. You can also sub the sweetener for stevia if you enjoy the taste.

Add nuts

Roasted nuts are delicious set into this raw chocolate. 

Vegan

Choose maple syrup or rice malt as your sweetener.

Source: wellnourished.com.au

Choc News: Three chocolate bars a month can reduce heart failure

Alison Campbell

Eating three chocolate bars every month can drastically reduce your risk of experiencing heart failure, scientists have claimed.

Many people often believe that in order to live as healthily as possible, they need to eliminate all forms of sugary snacks from their diets.

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However, a recent study presented at the European Society of Cardiology conference in Munich states that moderation, not deprivation, is key in preventing heart issues later on in life.

A team of researchers assessed more than half a million adults in order to determine how consumption of chocolate impacts heart health. They came to the conclusion that eating up to three chocolate bars a month can reduce risk of heart failure by 23 per cent in comparison to those who don’t eat any chocolate at all.

However, eating too much chocolate can lead to a 17 per cent increased risk of heart failure, which is why it’s important not to go overboard. Dr Chayakrit Krittanawong, resident at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai in New York and lead researcher of the study, explained how the flavonoids found in chocolate can be beneficial for one’s health.

“I would say moderate dark chocolate consumption is good for health.”

The team who conducted the study examined five separate studies for their research, which consisted of 575,852 individuals in total.

They stated that further research is needed to explore the connection between chocolate intake and heart health.

Earlier this year, a study carried out in California concluded that eating dark chocolate can have a positive effect on your mental health by relieving stress and boosting memory function


Source: www.independent.co.uk


Choc Recipe: Easy Vegan Chocolate

Alison Campbell

EASY VEGAN CHOCOLATE

Easy, 3-ingredient vegan chocolate! Naturally sweetened, customizable, super velvety and rich, and seriously good for you!

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PREP TIME: 20 minutes

COOK TIME: 3 minutes

TOTAL TIME: 23 minutes

Ingredients

  • 1 cup finely chopped cocoa butter* (packed)
  • 3-5 Tbsp maple syrup or agave nectar
  • 1/2 cup unsweetened cocoa powder or cacao powder*
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract (optional)
  • pinch sea salt (optional // plus more to taste)
  • cacao nibs (optional // for topping)

 

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Instructions

  1. Arrange 14 (amount as original recipe is written // adjust if altering batch size)mini cupcake liners on a small baking sheet. Set aside.

  2. Add 2 inches of water to a large saucepan and bring to a boil over medium high heat. Then set a medium glass or ceramic mixing bowl on top, making sure it's not touching the water (this creates a "double boiler").

  3. To the mixing bowl, add finely chopped cocoa butter and let melt - 2-3 minutes.

  4. Once melted, add the maple syrup or agave nectar and use a whisk or wooden spoon to mix until fluid and thoroughly combined. Remove bowl and set on a flat surface. Also, turn off stove-top heat and set saucepan aside.

  5. Add cacao or cocoa powder, vanilla (optional), and sea salt (optional), and whisk to combine until there are no clumps.

  6. Taste and adjust flavor as needed. I added about 3 Tablespoons agave total and a pinch more salt (amounts as original recipe is written // adjust if altering batch size), but it’s completely up to how sweet you prefer your chocolate.

  7. Carefully pour chocolate into 12-14 mini cupcake liners* (or 7 large cupcake liners // amount as original recipe is written // adjust if altering batch size) and top with more sea salt or cacao nibs (optional).

  8. Transfer chocolate to the freezer or refrigerator to set - about 10 minutes.

  9. Enjoy straight from the freezer, refrigerator, or at room temperature. Store leftovers in a well-sealed container in the refrigerator for 1 week, or in the freezer up to 1 month.

Source: minimalistbaker.com

Choc Recipe : Raw Chocolate Raspberry “Cheesecake” Sandwiches

Alison Campbell

Love is in the air....its only a couple of short weeks til Valentine's Day....so we thought we'd share a bit of raw vegan goodness with you. What's not to love. :)

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Ingredients

For the Chocolate Cookies
2 cups pitted dates
1/2 cup raw almonds
1/2 cup shredded unsweetened coconut
1/4 cup raw cacao powder
1/8 tsp pink Himalayan salt

For the Raspberry “Cheesecake” Filling:
3 cups soaked cashews
1 can full fat coconut milk (or coconut cream)
1/2 cup maple syrup
1/2 cup frozen raspberries
2 tbsp coconut oil

For the Chocolate Dip:
1/2 cup coconut oil (melted)
1/3 cup raw cacao powder
1/4 cup maple syrup
Pinch of pink Himalayan salt

Optional:
Chopped pistachios (for topping)

Method

For the cookies blend the shredded coconut, raw cacao, raw almonds, and salt in a food processor until a fine crumble forms. Add in the dates and blend until combined. Press the cookie mix into an 8″ cake pan lined with plastic wrap. Ensure that you have made a flat layer of cookie. Allow the mix to cool a bit in the freezer before pressing them with a heart-shaped cookie cutter. Once you have made all of your heart-shaped cookies, place them in a dehydrator for about an hour (125 degrees F).

For the “cheesecake”, blend all of the ingredients in a food processor until smooth. Pour and evenly distribute the mix in a separate or the same 8″ cake pan lined with plastic wrap. Place mix into the freezer for about 1-2 hours (or until you are able to work with it). Once frozen, press the mix into hearts using the heart-shaped cookie cutter. Once the cookies are out of the dehydrator (they should still be soft), sandwich the heart-shaped cheesecake filling between two pieces of cookie. Place each sandwich in the freezer.

For the chocolate coating, melt down the coconut oil on low heat and stir in the remaining ingredients. Dip one side of the sandwich in the chocolate. Sprinkle your toppings of choice onto the chocolate (chopped pistachios are pictured). Repeat for every sandwich and allow them to freeze.

Now they’re ready to enjoy! Mmmm.

Makes 6-8 sandwiches, depending on the size of your cookie cutter.

Sourcevegangirlfriend.com
ImagesAlexandra Courts

Chocoholic not-so-anonymous #16

Alison Campbell

My name is Kelly
I am a chocoholic.

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Are you inordinately fond of chocolate?
Definitely. I eat it everyday...it nourishes my soul.

Chocolate. Incentive or reward? Or both? 
Incentive. Its presence inspires me and keeps me sane.

 When did you know you were a chocoholic?
When I couldn't go a day without it and my friends and family would
hide my choc-hit from me for entertainment!

White, milk or dark?
Mostly dark unless it's got hazelnuts.  

Describe your favourite chocolate in three words.... 
Dark, vegan, crunchy 

Tell us about your most memorable chocolate experience?
Discovering raw organic vegan chocolate all in one for the first time. I was
in ecstasy as not only was it the most delicious taste ever but it was healthy
so there was zero guilt. So much pleasure!   

Where is your favourite place to indulge your choc-habit? 
In the shower. First things first, every morning.  

Secretly solo or shared indulgence?
Usually solo as sharing with anyone who is not fully appreciative is such a waste of chocolate.

Top choice-choc destination?
All places that sell a good range of vegan organic
dark chocolate..which includes you guys!    

Favourite product in the Love Byron Bay chocolate range?
Monsieur Truffes' Dark Hazelnut Gianduja

Kelly Boyle is a full time mama, and maker of healthy kid friendly chocolates.

 

Choc News: Callebaut releases chocolate with natural gold colour

Alison Campbell

European cocoa giant Barry Callebaut CG has released a naturally golden-coloured chocolate in time for the festive season. The gold chocolate has been in development for two years. 

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To create the gold colour, Belgian chocolatiers incorporate sugar and milk that has been caramelised into the chocolate. 

Technically a white chocolate, it contains cocoa butter, sugar, milk powder, milk sugar (lactose), whey powder, caramelised milk powder, caramelised sugar, soya lecithin (emulsifier), natural vanilla and salt. 

The resulting flavour has "notes of toffee, butter and cream", with an intense toasted caramel and slightly salty taste, and a milky, silk texture.

Callebaut's high melting point makes it suitable for cooking and a favourite among professional pastry chefs.

We predict the new hue will add a little more glam to your festive banquet, with the use of gold chocolate in classics such as chocolate mousse, fondant, rocky road, fudge, fondue, or a Christmas trifle.

Sourcegoodfood.com.au